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News Release 18-071

New institute to address massive data demands from upgraded Large Hadron Collider

Research will develop software for the biggest Big Data challenges

Data visualization

A data visualization from a simulation of collision between two protons that will occur at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). On average, up to 200 collisions will be visible in the collider's detectors at the same time. Shown here is a design for the Inner Tracker of the ATLAS detector, one of the hardware upgrades planned for the HL-LHC.

Credit: ATLAS Experiment 2018 CERN


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Bogdan Mihaila describes how the Large Hadron Collider is helping reveal new insights into the universe, and the need for software to handle the extreme challenges presented by its upgrade in 2026. Mihaila is the program officer overseeing the $25 million NSF award to create the Institute for Research and Innovation in Software for High-Energy Physics (IRIS-HEP) that will develop those software solutions.

Credit: NSF

 

Peter Elmer of Princeton University explains how the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a Higgs boson factory, and why hunting through its data is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Elmer is the principal investigator on the $25 million NSF award to create the Institute for Research and Innovation in Software for High-Energy Physics (IRIS-HEP), which will develop software solutions for the data challenges presented by future upgrades to the LHC.

Credit: NSF