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The Vizzies

VISUALIZATION CHALLENGE

Example winning entries

About the Competition

Some of science's most powerful statements have not been made in words: Da Vinciís “Vitruvian Man,” Darwin’s sketches of the evolutionary tree, Annie Jump Cannon’s work with stellar classification, Rosalind Franklin’s X-ray photography of DNA, LIGO’s illustration of colliding neutron stars. Science has, for centuries, been inextricably entwined with images and artistry. These visualizations are what connect scientists and citizens, creating a universal language that enables people the world over to exchange knowledge and to understand scientific ideas and phenomena.

This year, the Vizzies challenge enters its 16th cycle, and we are continuing the long history and tradition of scientific visualizations by asking you and everyone to submit your best science or engineering visualization. Formerly known as “The International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge,” the competition is currently cosponsored by NSF and Popular Science.

In addition to being featured on the NSF site and on PopSci.com, Vizzies Challenge winners will be awarded cash prizes. Expertsí Choice prizes and Peoples' Choice prizes will be awarded as checks made out to the registered team leader/submitter and may be shared among any additional team members listed on the registration form at the team leaderís direction. Up to five Expertsí Choice winners may be chosen from any category/media type and each winner will receive $2000, and up to three Peoples' Choice winners may be chosen and each winner will receive $500.

Prizes

Up to five Expertsí Choice winners may be chosen from any category/media type and each winner will receive $2000, and up to three Peoples' Choice winners may be chosen and each winner will receive $500.

The prizes will be awarded as checks made out to the registered team leader/submitter and may be shared among any additional team members listed on the registration form at the team leader's direction.

The Vizzies challenge opens Jan. 15, 2018 and closes on Apr. 15, 2018 so mark your calendars and prepare your entry!
If you have questions, please contact us at vizzies@nsf.gov.



This video highlights past winners of the Visualization Challenge.

(Note: NSF previously cosponsored the competition with the AAAS journal Science.)

Top images L-R: Trichomes (hairs) on tomato seed: Robert Rock Belliveau; Cuban banana cockroach: David D. Yager, Ph.D., University of Maryland; GPS satellite: Damian Pope, Greg Dick, Sean Bradley, Steve Kelley, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics; hummingbird: Esther Ng; complex function illustration: Konstantin Poelke, Konrad Polthier, Free University of Berlin